Sun Sentinel Article

Kindred Sprits ~ BrothersI am bless to have had this article [Selma journey brings kindred spirits together] published on the Opinion Page [Page 16A] in the Saturday, 08/29, Sun Sentinel. Thanks to Mr. Giraldo [Rafael] and to Mr. Antonio Fins of the Sun Sentinel.

I trust you have read my three blog articles relating to the civil rights struggle in the United States. If not, here are the titles and links to them:

Today—Selma, Alabama

From Selma to Montgomery, Alabama

March 25, 1965

These were tough times for our country. As a people, we are better for them.

Mr. Giraldo [Rafael] and I are close because of his many riding experiences as he trekked across the country. His riding experiences are similar to some of my touring experiences. His ride through Alabama is particularly poignant and drew us closer together.

We rode together as brothers the last two days of his awesome recumbent trike ride across the country.

Saturday, 08/29, I met him as he resolved a flatting issue with Manifest Destiny, his trike. We rode together, Mr. G. on his Expedition and me on my RANS Citi Crank Forward bike. It was a wonderful ride with GREAT conversation. We spent the evening together in my room after a scrumptious dinner from Hans Meijer. Thanks Hans!

Sunday, the final day of the tour, we awakened early, to ride the final miles. This time both of us on trikes—one Catrike Expedition and one Catrike 700.

We experienced a spectacular sunrise, followed by a day that became increasing hot as we came to the end of his journey. Rafael’s family and friends gave him a warm and loving reception.

Author: jalexartis

Avid cyclist, who loves photography, technology, blogging & cooking...

4 thoughts on “Sun Sentinel Article”

    1. Thanks Terry, I’m trying to get caught up here. I have so much yet to publish from the last 3 days or so of his tour. We spent more that riding time together–lots of conversation. Last night about 30 minutes on the phone. I’m to go back to Florida near the end of September for a panel on his tour. It is interesting how the Alabama stories are woven into the fabric of the Tour of Discovery. Destiny still sits at the school. As Rafael and I talked last night, it is doubtful she will ever be ridden again. He and others are liking the museum idea. BTW, I gt to speak with ROG of Indiana on Sunday. It is amazing how all the characters know each other. Good to hear from you. Take care…

      Jim

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  1. My essay, as submitted:

    Reflections on Time & Mr. Giraldo
    Why the interest? Why the intrigue?
    I’ve also wondered why. We are the same, yet very different. In the end, we have similar goals and motivations.
    Our similarities are striking. We both are driven by goal accomplishment. We happen to own recumbent trikes, both manufactured by Catrike of Winter Garden, Florida. I have toured, but not with my Catrike and not across the country, although a continental crossing is a goal. We love history—Rafael a student and teacher and I, more a student. I have been blessed to have taught for the U.S. Army in its ROTC program and at its Inspector General School. I understand the imparting of knowledge. During the Tour of Discovery, I’ve been impressed with Mr. Giraldo’s detailed knowledge of facts relating to the area through which he is passing. The interest and intrigue in Mr. G began with my reading about him and has simply exploded during his journey; yet, we are different.
    We are different ages—Rafael is 46 and I’m 63. My oldest child was born early ’69. He was born in South America and I in North America. He is white and I am black. From my readings, research and writing about Mr. Giraldo, it seems that, as a result of our struggles, we view some of life’s occurrences in a similar fashion. I think this is the case with his choice to include Selma and Montgomery Alabama in the path of his Tour of Discovery. As a son of the south, his decision to do so piqued my interest.
    Born in 1945, I lived in a segregated North Carolina. I lived the discriminations we read about and have seen in movies and on our television sets. I participated in sit-ins and protest in front of movie theaters and restaurants. I attended the university where sit-ins began. I know the pain deaths from that era brought. The raw emotions of my history and Mr. G’s trip through them motivated me to write 3 blog articles about the civil rights struggle of the ‘50s & ‘60s. They struck an accord with Mr. Giraldo. I must say, without surprise. Shortly after the first article, we spoke telephonically for the first time. The conversation confirmed how similar we are. It is my honor and pleasure to dedicate much of my blog to Rafael. Thank you sir! –jim
    By James A. Artis

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    1. As edited to fit the newspaper space:

      By James A. Artis

      Why the interest? Why the intrigue?
      I’ve also wondered why. We are the same, yet very different. In the end, we have similar goals and motivations.
      Our similarities are striking. We both are driven by goal accomplishment. We happen to own recumbent trikes, made by the same manufacturer in Florida.
      We love history. Rafael is both a student and teacher and I, more a student. During the Tour of Discovery, I’ve been impressed with Mr. Giraldo’s detailed knowledge of facts relating to the area through which he is passing.
      I have been blessed to have taught for the U.S. Army in its ROTC program and at its Inspector General School. I understand the imparting of knowledge.
      Yet, we are different, too.
      We are different ages — Rafael is 46 and I’m 63. He was born in South America and I in North America. He is white and I am black.
      Still, from my readings, research and writing about Mr. Giraldo, it seems that, as a result of our struggles, we view some of life’s occurrences in a similar fashion.
      I think this is the case with his choice to include Selma and Montgomery, Alabama, in the path of his Tour of Discovery. Because I am a son of the South, his decision to do so piqued my interest.
      Born in 1945, I lived in a segregated North Carolina. I lived the discrimination we read about and have seen in movies and on our television sets.
      I participated in sit-ins and protests in front of movie theaters and restaurants. I attended the university where sit-ins began. I know the pain that deaths from that era brought. The raw emotions of my history, and Mr. G’s trip through, them motivated me to write three blog articles about the civil rights struggle of the 1950s and 1960s.
      They struck an accord with Mr. Giraldo. I must say, without surprise.
      Shortly after the first article, we spoke telephonically for the first time. The conversation confirmed how similar we are. It is my honor and pleasure to dedicate much of my blog to Rafael.
      Thank you sir!

      Like

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